Indian Status Class Action

To any person in Canada whose grandmother lost her Indian status by marrying a non-Indian: You could be affected by a class action that has been authorized by the Court against the Attorney General of Canada.

A class action has been authorized on behalf of all persons in Canada, whose grandmother lost her Indian status by marrying a non-Indian and recovered ‘Indian status’ under paragraph 6(1)( c) of the Indian Act following the 1985 amendments to this Act and whose only Indian parent is eligible for Indian status under paragraph 6(1)( c.1) of the Indian Act as amended in 2010 and who themselves became eligible to Indian status on January 31, 2011 under subsection 6(2) of the Indian Act.

You are included in this class action lawsuit, and do NOT need to take any further action at this time, if ALL of the following are true: A class member is any person in Canada, where:

  • your grandmother lost her Indian status by marrying a non-Indian and recovered her Indian status under paragraph 6(1) (c) of the Indian act following the 1985 amendments; and,
  • your only Indian parent is eligible to Indian status under paragraph 6(1) (c.1) of the Indian act as amended in 2010 and,
  • you are eligible to Indian status under subsection 6(2) of the Indian Act.

[There is a rare situation where you may be excluded from this class action even if you meet the above three conditions – if you have brought an individual lawsuit regarding the same subject matter as this class action, you will be deemed to have “opted out” of this class action if you do not discontinue your individual action prior to the opt-out deadline, March 25th, 2019.]

The Court has not yet decided liability issues.  The plaintiff will have to prove the claims of the class at a trial. During the trial, the Court would hear from the parties and make a decision about whether the plaintiff or the defendant should prevail.

If you are a putative member of the Class, your rights may be impacted. Please click and read thru the below “Notice of Authorization” for official notice details relating to this class action.  You have up to 30 days to opt-out of this class action lawsuit (if you wish to opt-out, you must complete and sign the opt-out form available below.  Your opt-out form must be received by the Clerk of the Superior Court of Quebec on or before March 25th, 2019 if you wish to opt-out.)

YOUR OPTIONS

At this point, you must decide whether to stay in the Class or remove yourself from the Class before the March 25th, 2019.

  • If you do nothing at all, and you fit the definition of the Class, you will automatically be included in this class action lawsuit. You will be bound by all of the decisions of the Court, whether they are favourable to you and the Class or not.  If any benefits are awarded, you will have to take certain actions in order to claim your benefits.
  • If you wish to remove yourself from the Class, you must do so on or before March 25th, 2019 by filing an opt out form. You will not be bound by the decisions of the Court in this action, but you also will not share in any money or benefits that are recovered as a result of this action.  You retain your right to sue the Respondent individually about the same subject matter, if you so choose.

If you have any questions, please call or email info@merchantlaw.com to obtain further information from class counsel, Merchant Law Group LLP.

Notice of Authorization

Opt-Out Form


À toutes les personnes au Canada dont la grand-mère a perdu le statut d’Indienne à la suite de son mariage à un non Indien : Une action collective peut affecter vos droits.

Une action collective a été autorisée contre le Procureur général du Canada, pour le compte de toutes les personnes au Canada dont la grand-mère a perdu le statut d’Indienne et a recouvré son statut d’Indienne en vertu du paragraphe 6(1) (c) de la Loi sur les Indiens à la suite des amendements de 1985 à cette loi et dont le seul parent Indien est éligible au statut d’Indien en vertu du paragraphe 6(1)(c.1) de la Loi sur les Indiens telle qu’amendée en 2010 et qui sont elles-mêmes devenues éligibles au statut d’Indien le 31 janvier 2011 en vertu du paragraphe 6(2) de la Loi sur les Indiens.

Le tribunal n’a pas encore décidé si le défendeur, le Procureur général du Canada peut être tenu responsable et aucune allégation n’a été prouvée devant le tribunal. Toutefois, si vous êtes visé par l’action collective, vos droits pourraient être affectés. Vous avez le droit de vous exclure de cette action et avez 30 jours (25 mars 2019) de la publication de cet avis pour le faire.

Avis d’authorization

Formulaire d’exclusion

Merchant Law Group LLP has 10 offices across Canada, with lawyers practising law in six provinces. Merchant Law Group LLP and Tony Merchant, Q.C. are well known for pursuing class action lawsuits in Canada including litigation regarding Winners/HomeSense, Various Cellular Phone Fees, BCE Dividends, GM Gasket Manifolds, Hip Implants, Lead Paint in Toys (and similar consumer products), Maple Leaf, Celebrex/Bextra, Vioxx, Sony, Residential Schools and various other cases. Tony Merchant, Q.C. is known to be one of Canada’s most active litigators with more than 600 reported cases in leading Caselaw Journals, having argued thousands of cases before the Canadian and American Courts, in Trial and Administrative Courts, and the Courts of Appeal of various American and Canadian jurisdictions, the Federal Court of Canada, and the Supreme Court of Canada. Tony Merchant, Q.C., has a long history in pursuing public policy cases and is a former Member of the Legislative Assembly (M.L.A.)